Most Viewed: Last TWO YEARS
  • Editorial|Open Access

    Cancer drug resistance: a new perspective

    Godefridus J. Peters
    Cancer Drug Resist 2018;1:1-5. | doi:10.20517/cdr.2018.03
    Published on: 19 Mar 2018  | Viewed:3393  | Downloaded:254
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  • Review|Open Access

    How to overcome ATP-binding cassette drug efflux transporter-mediated drug resistance?

    Adrian C. Jaramillo, Farah Al Saig, Jacqueline Cloos, Gerrit Jansen, Godefridus J. Peters
    P-glycoprotein (ABCB1), multidrug resistance protein-1 (ABCC1) and breast cancer resistance protein (ABCG2) belong to the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) superfamily of proteins that play an important physiological role in protection of the body from toxic xenobiotics and endogenous metabolites. Beyond this, these transporters determine the toxicity profile of many drugs, and confer multidrug resistance (MDR) in cancer cells associated with a poor treatment outcome of cancer patients. It has long been hypothesized that inhibition of ABC drug efflux transporters will increase drug accumulation... Read more
    Cancer Drug Resist 2018;1:6-29. | doi:10.20517/cdr.2018.02
    Published on: 19 Mar 2018  | Viewed:2828  | Downloaded:152
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  • Original Article|Open Access

    Reduction of mitomycin C resistance in human bladder cancer T24 cells by knocking-down ras oncogene

    Osama Sharaf Eldin, Abdel-Motaal Fouda, Amany R. Youssef, Peter Hamilton, Perry Maxwell, Kate E. Williamson
    Aim: Mitomycin C (MMC) is a commonly used as intravesical treatment for superficial bladder cancer. However, its role in combination with ras inhibition has not been investigated. The aim of this study was to explore the role of ras in MMC-induced apoptosis in T24 bladder cancer cells and to determine the efficacy of combination therapy in vitro. Methods: We measured the effects of various doses of MMC on apoptosis induction as well as on ras, ERK and Ki-67 protein expression by T24 cell line using immunocytochemistry, flow cytometry and Western blotting. We also tested the effect of siRNA... Read more
    Cancer Drug Resist 2018;1:59-71. | doi:10.20517/cdr.2017.01
    Published on: 19 Mar 2018  | Viewed:2726  | Downloaded:91
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  • Review|Open Access

    Drug targets and resistance mechanisms in multiple myeloma

    Janine Nass, Thomas Efferth
    Multiple myeloma (MM), a malignancy of plasma cells, is the second most prevalent blood cancer (10%). A PubMed search has been conducted for English research papers and reviews published until January 2018. Numerous drugs are used in treatment of MM. These include the antineoplastic alkylating agents cyclophosphamide, busulfan and melphalan, immunomodulators such as lenalidomide and thalidomide, corticosteroids including dexamethasone, microtubule-targeting agents, such as paclitaxel and vinca alkaloids, as well as the proteasome inhibitors bortezomib and carfilzomib. Despite the... Read more
    Cancer Drug Resist 2018;1:87-117. | doi:10.20517/cdr.2018.04
    Published on: 19 Jun 2018  | Viewed:2350  | Downloaded:147
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  • Original Article|Open Access

    Identification and targeting of CD22ΔE12 as a molecular RNAi target to overcome drug resistance in high-risk B-lineage leukemias and lymphomas

    Fatih M. Uckun, Sanjive Qazi
    Aim: CD22ΔE12 as an oncogenic driver lesion in aggressive and drug-resistant B-precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia (BPL) cells. The purpose of the present study was to identify the CD22ΔE12-specific signature transcriptome in human BPL cells and evaluate the clinical potential of a nanoscale formulation of CD22ΔE12-siRNA as an RNAi therapeutic against drug-resistant BPL. CD22ΔE12-siRNA nanoparticles significantly improved the event-free survival (EFS) outcome of NOD/SCID (NS) mice challenged with human BPL xenograft cells. Methods: Gene expression and translational bioinformatics... Read more
    Cancer Drug Resist 2018;1:30-47. | doi:10.20517/cdr.2017.03
    Published on: 19 Mar 2018  | Viewed:2302  | Downloaded:34
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  • Original Article|Open Access

    Resistance mechanism to cisplatin in NCI-H460 non-small cell lung cancer cell line: investigating apoptosis, autophagy, and cytogenetic damage

    Érica Ballestreri, Daniel Simon, Ana Paula de Souza, Camila Schultz Grott, Débora Dreher Nabinger, Rafael Rodrigues Dihl, Ivana Grivicich
    Aim: To investigate the effects of cisplatin on the human non-small cell lung carcinoma (NCI-H460) cell line regarding cytotoxicity, genotoxicity, and expression of genes associated with apoptosis (BIRC5) and autophagy (BECN1). Methods: Cell cultures were treated with cisplatin concentrations (0.16-33.3 μmol/L) for 48 h. Mutagenicity and acute and chronic cytotoxicities were assessed using the MTT, clonogenic, and cytokinesis-block micronucleus assays. Gene expression of BIRC5 and BECN1 was evaluated by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Results: Cisplatin IC50 (0.33 μmol/L)... Read more
    Cancer Drug Resist 2018;1:72-81. | doi:10.20517/cdr.2017.02
    Published on: 19 Mar 2018  | Viewed:2289  | Downloaded:153
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  • Original Article|Open Access

    Improved potency of F10 relative to 5-fluorouracil in colorectal cancer cells with p53 mutations

    Anthony Dominijanni, William H. Gmeiner
    Aim: Resistance to fluoropyrimidine drugs (FPs) is a major cause of mortality in colorectal cancer (CRC). We assessed the potency advantage of the polymeric FP F10 relative to 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) in four human CRC cell lines that differ only in TP53 mutational status to determine how p53 mutations affect drug response and whether F10 is likely to improve outcomes. Methods: HCT-116 human CRC cells (p53+/+) and three isogenic variants (p53-/-, R248W/+, R248W/-) were assessed for drug response. Resistance factors were derived from cell viability data and used to establish the relative... Read more
    Cancer Drug Resist 2018;1:48-58. | doi:10.20517/cdr.2018.01
    Published on: 19 Mar 2018  | Viewed:2285  | Downloaded:100
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  • Review|Open Access

    Sphingolipid metabolism and drug resistance in ovarian cancer

    Kelly M. Kreitzburg, Robert C. A. M. van Waardenburg, Karina J. Yoon
    Despite progress in understanding molecular aberrations that contribute to the development and progression of ovarian cancer, virtually all patients succumb to drug resistant disease at relapse. Emerging data implicate bioactive sphingolipids and regulation of sphingolipid metabolism as components of response to chemotherapy or development of resistance. Increases in cytosolic ceramide induce apoptosis in response to therapy with multiple classes of chemotherapeutic agents. Aberrations in sphingolipid metabolism that accelerate the catabolism of ceramide or that prevent the production and... Read more
    Cancer Drug Resist 2018;1:181-97. | doi:10.20517/cdr.2018.06
    Published on: 19 Sep 2018  | Viewed:1878  | Downloaded:121
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  • Editorial|Open Access

    Targeted therapies in cancer: where are we going?

    Elisa Giovannetti, Jose A. Rodriguez
    This article belongs to the Special Issue Targeted cancer therapy
    Cancer Drug Resist 2018;1:82-6. | doi:10.20517/cdr.2018.05
    Published on: 19 Jun 2018  | Viewed:1228  | Downloaded:90
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  • Opinion|Open Access

    Linking tyrosine kinase inhibitor-mediated inflammation with normal epithelial cell homeostasis and tumor therapeutic responses

    Natalia J Gurule, Lynn E. Heasley
    Receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) bearing oncogenic mutations in EGFR, ALK and ROS1 occur in a significant subset of lung adenocarcinomas. Tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) targeting tumor cells dependent on these oncogenic RTKs yield tumor shrinkage, but also a variety of adverse events. Skin toxicities, hematological deficiencies, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, and headache are among the most common, with more acute and often fatal side effects such as liver failure and interstitial lung disease occurring less frequently. In normal epithelia, RTKs regulate tissue homeostasis. For example,... Read more
    This article belongs to the Special Issue Targeted cancer therapy
    Cancer Drug Resist 2018;1:118-25. | doi:10.20517/cdr.2018.12
    Published on: 19 Sep 2018  | Viewed:1106  | Downloaded:122
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  • Review|Open Access

    Molecular bases of Sorcin-dependent resistance to chemotherapeutic agents

    Ilaria Genovese, Andrea Ilari, Theo Battista, Valerio Chiarini, Francesco Fazi, Annarita Fiorillo, Gianni Colotti
    Soluble resistance-related calcium binding protein (Sorcin) is a protein initially labelled “resistance-related”, since it is co-amplified with ABCB1 in multidrug (MD)-resistant cells. While for years Sorcin overproduction was believed to be a by-product of the co-amplification of its gene with the P-glycoprotein gene, many recent studies view Sorcin as an oncoprotein, playing an important role in MD resistance (MDR). Sorcin is one of the most highly expressed calcium-binding proteins, which is overexpressed in many human tumors and MD resistant cancers, and represents a novel MDR marker.... Read more
    This article belongs to the Special Issue Targeted cancer therapy
    Cancer Drug Resist 2018;1:164-80. | doi:10.20517/cdr.2018.10
    Published on: 19 Sep 2018  | Viewed:941  | Downloaded:78
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  • Review|Open Access

    Hitting a moving target: inhibition of the nuclear export receptor XPO1/CRM1 as a therapeutic approach in cancer

    Maria Sendino, Miren Josu Omaetxebarria, Jose Antonio Rodríguez
    Cellular homeostasis crucially relies on the correct nucleocytoplasmic distribution of a vast number of proteins and RNA molecules, which are shuttled in and out of the nucleus by specialized transport receptors. The nuclear export receptor XPO1, also called CRM1, mediates the translocation of hundreds of proteins and several classes of RNA to the cytoplasm, and thus regulates critical signaling pathways and cellular functions. The normal function of XPO1 appears to be often disrupted in malignant cells due to gene mutations or, most commonly, aberrant overexpression. Due to its important... Read more
    This article belongs to the Special Issue Targeted cancer therapy
    Cancer Drug Resist 2018;1:139-63. | doi:10.20517/cdr.2018.09
    Published on: 19 Sep 2018  | Viewed:431  | Downloaded:35
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  • Review|Open Access

    Glutamine metabolism in cancer therapy

    Tra-Ly Nguyen, Raúl V. Durán
    The amino acid glutamine plays a key role in the metabolism of highly proliferating cells. During malignant transformation, cancer cells modify the consumption and processing of glutamine to sustain cell growth and proliferation. In some cases, these cancer cells become addicted to glutamine. Thus, targeting the metabolism of glutamine has been developed during last years as a potential strategy against cancer. In this review, we summarized the last advances in our knowledge about the role of glutamine metabolism in cancer therapy. Read more
    This article belongs to the Special Issue Targeted cancer therapy
    Cancer Drug Resist 2018;1:126-38. | doi:10.20517/cdr.2018.08
    Published on: 19 Sep 2018  | Viewed:349  | Downloaded:51
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Cancer Drug Resistance ISSN 2578-532X (Online)
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